Vaccine - Flu - Adult

This is a vaccine that decreases your risk of getting the flu, also known as influenza.




This is a vaccine that decreases your risk of getting the flu, also known as influenza.



Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is an upper respiratory infection. It is caused by one of the influenza viruses. Some people may have an increased risk of serious complications if they catch the flu. This can include those who are:

  • Pregnant
  • Ages 50 and over
  • Very young
  • Chronically ill and have weak immune systems

Serious complications can happen even in people who are healthy. New flu vaccines are made each year to protect against the influenza viruses that are current at that time.

Serious complications can happen even in people who are healthy. New flu vaccines are made each year to protect against the influenza viruses that are current at that time.

The flu vaccine can be given as a shot or nasal spray. However, the nasal spray should not be given to the following people:

  • Pregnant women
  • Children ages 2 and younger
  • People ages 49 and over
  • People who have taken an influenza antiviral medication within the last 24 hours
  • People with certain medical conditions or a weakened immune system

The nasal spray is also not recommended for caregivers of certain people with a severely weakened immune system. Check with your health care provider to see if you are eligible for the flu vaccine nasal spray.

Important note: Getting the flu vaccine every year is the best way to protect you from getting the flu. It's also the best way to stop you from spreading the flu to the people you love.

Each year's updated version of the influenza vaccine typically becomes available during the late summer. However, immunizations given as late as March can still protect you from catching the flu late in the season.

Most people only need one dose of the flu vaccine each year. If your child is age 9 or younger, check with your health care provider to see if two doses are needed. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people ages 6 months and older receive a flu vaccine UNLESS there are specific medical reasons for not receiving it. These include:

  • A severe allergic reaction to a previous flu vaccine
  • A severe egg allergy; however if you have a mild egg allergy, you may be able to get the flu vaccine, so ask your health care provider for details
  • Some people who have had Guillain-Barre syndrome, a disease that affects the nervous system

You may want to wait to get the vaccine if you have a moderate to severe illness (not just a cold). However, if you have a stuffy nose, you may need the flu shot instead of the nasal spray.

You may want to wait to get the vaccine if you have a moderate to severe illness (not just a cold). However, if you have a stuffy nose, you may need the flu shot instead of the nasal spray.

Some people are at an increased risk for complications if they get the flu. It's even more important these individuals get the flu vaccine. Those at increased risk include:

  • Pregnant women
  • Children ages 6 months to 5 years
  • Adults ages 50 and older
  • People with chronic diseases, such as diabetes or lung, heart, kidney, blood or neurological disease
  • People who have a weakened immune system due to illness or medication (such as steroids)
  • Children who take long-term aspirin therapy
  • People who are extremely obese
  • People who live in chronic care facilities
  • American Indians/Alaska Natives
  • Household contacts and caregivers of children ages 5 and younger or adults ages 50 and older
  • Household contacts and caregivers of people who are at increased risk for complications
  • Health care workers

It's important to remember that each year people die from flu complications, even though they had no known risk factors.

You should contact your health care provider if it's flu season and you have not received your yearly flu vaccine. Here is a list of questions you can ask during your appointment:

  • Which flu vaccine should I get, and why?
  • What are the side effects of this vaccine?
  • What are the risks if I don't get the vaccine?

Many local pharmacies and convenience care clinics provide flu shots.

Source UHC.com

Also known as:

Vaccine Influenza
Vaccine Flu
Vaccine - Flu - Adult
Vaccine
Seasonal Flu Shot
Influenza Vaccine
Influenza Shot
Immunization Influenza
Immunization Flu
Flu Vaccine
Flu Shot


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