Birth Control - Implant System - Nexplanon - 3 Years

This is a flexible plastic rod that is placed under the skin of the upper arm. When in place it releases a hormone to prevent pregnancy.




This is a flexible plastic rod that is placed under the skin of the upper arm. When in place it releases a hormone to prevent pregnancy.



An implant birth control system is a flexible plastic rod that is placed under the skin of the upper arm.. When in place it releases a hormone (progestin) to prevent pregnancy.

  • Nexplanon is the only contraceptive implant that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • The implant is inserted in your healthcare provider's office and can remain in place for three years.

A contraceptive implant system prevents pregnancy by:

  • Suppressing the release of an egg from the ovaries
  • Making the mucus around the cervix thicker, which stops the sperm from entering the uterus and fertilizing an egg

Your healthcare provider may recommend this type of birth control if you:

  • Do not want to have to remember to take a pill every day
  • Want a method of birth control that is quickly reversible
  • Want a method of birth control that does not contain any estrogen
  • Want a method of birth control that will decrease menstrual pain

A contraceptive implant may not be recommended if you have abnormal vaginal bleeding that has not been evaluated or:

  • An allergy to any of the ingredients in the implant
  • A history of blood clots, heart attack or stroke
  • A history of liver disease or breast cancer

It is important to remember that a contraceptive implant does not protect against any STDs. If you are not in a committed relationship with a single partner, you should practice safe sex and use a condom during any sexual contact.

Make an appointment with your healthcare provider to discuss your birth control options. If you decide to use a contraceptive implant, ask your healthcare provider the following questions.

  • What are the benefits and risks of using a contraceptive implant?
  • How does a contraceptive implant compare with other types of birth control?
  • What symptoms are normal while using the contraceptive implant? When should I be concerned?
  • How do I care for the area where the implant was inserted?
  • When do I need to use a back-up method of birth control?

Source UHC.com

Also known as:

Birth Control - Implant System - Nexplanon
Nexplanon
Contraceptive Implant
Implant
Family Planning
Progestin
Contraception
Birth Control


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