Birth Control - Contraceptive Ring

This is a flexible, clear ring that is inserted into the vagina. When in place it releases two hormones to prevent pregnancy.




This is a flexible, clear ring that is inserted into the vagina. When in place it releases two hormones to prevent pregnancy.



A contraceptive ring is a flexible, clear ring that is inserted into the vagina. When in place it releases two hormones (estrogen and progestin) to prevent pregnancy.

  • NuvaRing is the only contraceptive ring that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • A woman inserts the ring into her vagina once a month. It is left in place for three weeks out of the month.

A contraceptive ring prevents pregnancy by:

  • Suppressing the release of an egg from the ovaries
  • Making the mucus around the cervix thicker, which stops the sperm from entering the uterus and fertilizing an egg

Your healthcare provider may recommend this type of birth control if you:

  • Do not want to have to remember to take a pill every day
  • Want a method of birth control that is quickly reversible
  • Want to reduce the risks of side effects by receiving a lower dose of hormones
  • Want a method of birth control that is not as likely to cause weight gain or irregular bleeding

A contraceptive ring may not be recommended if you:

  • Are having major surgery and will be inactive for a long period of time
  • Are breast-feeding or are older than 35 and smoke
  • Have an allergy to any of the ingredients in the ring
  • Have a history of toxic shock syndrome or vaginal irritation
  • Have a history of blood clots, certain cancers, or liver disease
  • Have a history of a heart attack, stroke, migraines, high blood pressure, or unexplained vaginal bleeding

It is important to remember that a contraceptive ring does not protect against any STDs. If you are not in a committed relationship with a single partner, you should practice safe sex and use a condom during any sexual contact.

Make an appointment with your healthcare provider to discuss your birth control options. If you decide to use a contraceptive ring, ask your healthcare provider the following questions.

  • What are the benefits and risks of using a contraceptive ring?
  • How does a contraceptive ring compare with other types of birth control?
  • What symptoms are normal while using the contraceptive ring? When should I be concerned?
  • What should I do if the ring falls out? When should I reinsert it? When should I insert a new ring?
  • When do I need to use a back-up method of birth control?

Source UHC.com

Also known as:

Birth Control - Contraceptive Ring
Family Planning
Progestin
Contraception
Birth Control
Nuva-Ring
Contraceptive Ring
Estrogen


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